Tag Archives: future

The Future of the Media

I believe that the media will still be a very strong driving force behind how people get their information in the future.  I think that the new media culture and technology will still have a similar effect, if not a stronger one, on my peers and myself in the future.  Being a Strategic Communications major at DU, I have realized that many of my classes have taught me how to correctly operate social media sites to promote businesses.  Also, as an intern this past fall term, I was in charge of doing majority of the Facebook, Twitter, and blog posts that promoted the festival I was interning for.  A while ago, a major teaching you this line of work was unheard of.  Now, it seems to be a norm throughout many schools (however, they usually call it just Media Studies or Communications). This new major opportunity in colleges leads me to predict that the media will be a very important tool used by all companies in the future, as many are hopping on that bandwagon now.  I think that my peers and I will be using more types of social media outlets and seeing the news on mainly a computer screen in the future.

I think that the future of media and the lives of the future children will be a brighter outlook.  Though I spent most of my time outdoors as a kid and occasionally a computer/video game or two, I feel that the future generation of children will be spending much more time on the newer kid-friendly tablets that they are creating for children.  I will definitely still make my kids play outside, because that is the fun of being a kid, but I think that the new children will be very accustomed to the new technologies since it seems to be a trend that kids 8 years and older have tablets (once saw a 3 year old with an iPad; don’t know the logic behind that one).  The new program that is all over commercials, ABC Mouse, is a testament to how young children are using technology to further their education.  I feel that the new generation of kids will be extremely technologically savvy.

I also predict that many of the social media outlets, such as Facebook and Twitter, will be slowly filtered out to make way for newer and more efficient social media sites.  I also feel that there will be more social media sites in the future, which has the potential to complicate things.

What began as a futuristic way to send and spread information has now seemed to engulf many people’s lives in a swirl of different social media sites. I for see this trend continuing in the future.  I predict that different forms of media (typically technological media) expanding and the print media slowly dissipating. I hope print media does not die out entirely, but I see it fading into the background by the time our generation has passed on.

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The Media’s Future: “Infotainment”?

The new media culture and its ever-changing technology has greatly changed both the way we live and communicate. What began as a mere way to spread information to the public has since been high-jacked with the bombardment of advertisements trying to sell us, not only a product, but a lifestyle. We now see a polarization of viewpoints represented across various different cable TV channels, but even more than that is the selection made available to us. All of these channels cater to an audience wider than ever before (i.e. The ‘Golf Channel’ exists, I kid you not). Any cable subscriber can flip through tons of channels, and this speaks a lot to how far we have gone as a collective society.

Gone are the days in which we spend our leisure time “outside”, a word we are now completely unfamiliar with. The programming itself has become so much more centralized around entertaining the public rather than informing it. As discussed in class, there is the notion that we are collectively ‘dumbing ourselves down’. The evidence as of late would clearly support this argument, i.e. CNN’s ‘Breaking News’ alert when Justin Beiber was arrested.  Even I myself am guilty of this, as an avid reality TV viewer who spent a good majority of his weekend watching a marathon of America’s Funniest Home videos. While watching guys skateboard into rails and end up hospitalized is great and all; it really offers me no sort of intellectual benefit. Am I aware that I should have been reading a book or using my time more productively? Of course. Will this realization change my overall actions in the future? Most likely not, and therein lies the problem. Society’s obsession with celebrities and entertainment speaks volumes about where we are headed.

The future is difficult to predict, as we already know. What I can be certain of is that technology will continue to change at a rapid rate. We are above and beyond where we were even 10 years ago. This ever-changing technology will continue to out-do itself as we progress further. Technologies today are constantly working to be ‘the next big thing’ as companies attempt to actively out-do one another. We have recently seen our phones evolve into smartphones, and then tablets and watches, and even now to smart glasses (i.e. google glass) and this competitive fight to be the ‘top brand’ has only made the general public the “winners” as we stand back and buy every new product out there. This new technology, while engaging and highly efficient, has also come with its fair share of burdens. What used to be the norm was mailing letters to distant relatives, and now we instead Facebook them. What used to be the norm was having face-to-face conversations with friends, and now we instead Instant Message or text them. Just last week my geography professor Dr. Russel Fielding told us about how he facebook friend-ed a native of Tristan Da Cunha (very small remote island off the coast of South Africa) and he spoke to this individual about how our class was learning of the island’s unique geography. To which the islander responded, “Oh how fun! Please feel free to come on by anytime.” Dr. Russell Fielding now plans to create an Interterm course where he will hopefully be able to take a few DU students out there. Had this exchange taken place a mere 20 years earlier, it would have taken months of letters going back and forth. This new instant communication is quite powerful, but also makes us very lazy.

Taking it further, parents often times use an iPad as a parent figure as a means of quieting the child, which may seem like the easy solution for the moment, but this begs the question: Is that really the most beneficial solution for the child?  We see children today receive their own phone at such a young age, and this is a trend that will continue to be monitored moving forward. I would argue that having children rely on technology does more harm than good in that they ultimately learn very little. Since we have google to find any answer to pretty much any question, our actual in-depth understanding has diminished. In order for us to succeed moving forward, it is in our best interest to maintain the appropriate balance. Will society act on this notion? That’s the big overarching question yet to be determined.

Media and Technology Today

Throughout history there has been a silent understanding between the media and society, it has been a process of sharing information and knowledge.  When and why did this understanding change?  Today there is a disconnect between the media and society through what the media deems popular news and entertainment and what society wants or might expect to hear/see.  In this class we have learned some of the reasons for this disconnect.  From big media conglomerations and oligopolies, the realization that news can make money, journalist trying to maintain their position as gatekeepers and individuals taking on the responsibility of gatewatching and crashing in order to maintain some authority in an environment that is controlled by those with money vs. those with information.

In my opinion technology is the biggest advantage and disadvantage to the media and also to the individuals using it.  New forms of technology enable us to communicate our opinions and the ideals we believe in but it can also negatively influence those same beliefs.  A mass majority of our time whether in class, at work or at home is spent interacting with technology but how much of the content is informative and valuable?  The majority of media is a distraction from what is truly going on around us.  Yet, this new technology also gives individuals the ability to become their own journalist and share real-time, live information from around the world.  Creating the citizen journalist.

For me it is not about where the information comes from or how the story is uncovered, it is about finding a balance between news and entertainment along with objectivity and business interests.  I want to be an informed citizen but why does that mean searching multiple news outlets to find diverse accounts and reliable information that is not about celebrity gossip or political slander.

The Internet for things other then facebook and cat meme’s

After studying the affects of media in our society throughout this quarter I am left with this question, how can individual people use powerful forms of media to make a better world?

Technologies develop over time to allow media forms to spread information to mass amounts of people at an ever-increasing rate.  Only in recent years have people been able to communicate across the globe instantaneously through the Internet.  This new form of media changes the previous mindless consumer to an active consumer/producer of information.  It provides anyone, with access to the these technologies, the ability to comment and interact with each other online.  Through the internet people truly have the power to come together and voice their opinions and concerns.

Currently, it is true that people are overwhelmed with these new capabilities and we still haven’t learned how to use them to our utmost advantage.  There is freedom with this form of media, which allows anyone to post and comment whether their being truthful or not.  Also, it allows for anyone to view what he or she pleases at their own discretion.  This is what makes the internet a profound and useful form of media.

There are many well known websites that people use habitually to keep up to date with social life and entertainment.   What if people took some of that time to find information on things that can actually help to change the world?  When I asked Google I easily found sites that provoke people to converse about important societal issues, like these two “Standford Social Innovation Review” and “World Future Society.” The usefulness of these websites is that they not only bring scholars from around the world to the same place to discuss similar concerns, but they also allow any ordinary person to comment and interact.  There are other websites like “The Zeitgeist Movement” that actually help people to create events at specified meeting places around the world in order to bring people together and discuss the future of our planet.

It is apparent that there are plenty of well established websites like these where people with similar views are able to get together and attempt to make a difference in the World.  All it seems to take is the initiative of the individual.  I can only hope that these sites become more entertaining and promoted in a way that everyone will want to look at them and become involved, rather than wasting time with cat meme’s and facebook.

If people are able to learn how to use these forms of media in a better way we will be able to create an overall better functioning World.  We are able to solve many societal issues by becoming active participants and even producers of media if it is done in a truthful and meaningful way.  It would be incredible if someone created a technology that ensured the validity of online posts, or better yet any form of media.

If there is enough similar actions of the individuals in agency, then it will influence change in society and its structure.  Change is certain, I simply hope people choose to come together through these forms of media to rise up and create a better world. I expect a purer form of democracy in the future, due to the proficiency of communication between anyone and everyone worldwide.

http://www.wfs.org/

http://www.thezeitgeistmovement.com/

http://www.ssireview.org/blog

Is it Possible to Predict the Future of the Media?

As we have learned throughout this class, the relationship between the media and society has always been complex and multi-faceted. With technological advancements, these complexities have grown exponentially. “News” is seen much differently today than it was seen 100 years ago. Today, journalists aim to “break” the news more so than to “explain” the news. Additionally, media outlets are now look and act like traditional businesses while they used to be considered as their own category: news corporations. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, the term “journalist” is expanding. Widespread and accessible technological advances allow for almost anyone to act as journalists and spread information instantly (citizen journalism).

Considering how much the media has developed in 100 years, it is very difficult to predict the future of the media. It is very apparent that technology will play a primary role; what role, exactly, is hard to determine. Media experts are also unaware of the future of the media. In an article published by The New York Times, Eric Pfanner even stated, “Predicting the outcome of a revolution is a fool’s game” when discussing technology’s future impact on the media. Despite this statement, he outlines a few inevitable facts about the evolving nature of the media.

Firstly, media will continue to digitalize making almost all media digital. Next, the globalization of media will increase and new markets will emerge. The article also mentioned the difficulty of predicting the future of particular media channels. For example, newspapers and the recording industry have been struggling lately. Is television next? According to Pfinner, probably not due to its increasing similarities to the Internet.

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Hopefully the upcoming and inevitable changes will result in more civic participation from members of the society. While the changes in media could also result in isolating and dividing people, ideally, it would work to inform the masses accurately and efficiently. Overall, like Pfinner said, it is almost to impossible to predict what the media will look like when our children are grown, let alone what it will look like five years from now.